Forest Preservation in a Changing Climate: REDD+ and Indigenous and Community Rights in Indonesia and Tanzania

I am very pleased to announce the publication of my new book Forest Preservation in a Changing Climate: REDD+ and Indigenous and Community Rights in Indonesia and Tanzania (Cambridge University Press).

This book provides a comprehensive socio-legal examination of how global efforts to fight climate change by reducing carbon emissions in the forestry sector (known as REDD+) have affected the rights of Indigenous Peoples and local communities in developing countries. Grounded in extensive qualitative empirical research conducted globally, the book shows that the transnational legal process for REDD+ has created both serious challenges and unexpected opportunities for the recognition and protection of indigenous and community rights. It reveals that the pursuit of REDD+ has resulted in important variations in how human rights standards are understood and applied across multiple sites of law in the field of REDD+, with mixed results for Indigenous Peoples and local communities in Indonesia and Tanzania. With its original findings, rigourous research design, and interdisciplinary analytical framework, this book will make a valuable contribution to the study of transnational legal processes in a globalizing world.

An open-access electronic version of the book can be downloaded here. A printed version can also be purchased here from Cambridge University Press.

*I want to thank Carbon Tanzania for giving me permission to use the photograph taken from its Yaeda Valley Project that appears on the cover reproduced here. Carbon Tanzania is a social enterprise that works with Indigenous communities in Tanzania to support the protection of their forests through engagement with the voluntary carbon market. Given the high level of social and environmental performance that it has achieved in its project and its community-based approach, I have committed to purchasing carbon credits from Carbon Tanzania to off-set the carbon emissions resulting from any travel that I may undertake to promote this book.

*I want to thank Carbon Tanzania for giving me permission to use the photograph taken from its Yaeda Valley Project that appears on the cover reproduced here. Carbon Tanzania is a social enterprise that works with Indigenous communities in Tanzania to support the protection of their forests through engagement with the voluntary carbon market. Given the high level of social and environmental performance that it has achieved in its project and its community-based approach, I have committed to purchasing carbon credits from Carbon Tanzania to off-set the carbon emissions resulting from any travel that I may undertake to promote this book.